Read Scripture Guide for April 29 through May 5

HERE'S HOW:

  1. Grab a Bible. If it fits your style, also grab a journal to write in.
    • Which Bible version is best? The one you read! If you don’t have one, let us know! Print, Online, and Apps are available.
    • Invite family or friends to join you.
  2. Pray! Ask the Holy Spirit to help you as you read. HE WILL.
  3. Check to see if there is a video to watch today
  4. Look up and read the assigned reading for the day.
  5. Look up the assigned Psalm that day: pray it out loud.
  6. Pray! Ask the Father to apply those readings to your life and to help you join Jesus where He is already working. HE WILL.
  7. Rally together each Sunday at Lindwedel Winery at 9:15 am with questions and discussion.
  8. Let's get started!!

April 29

Read Isaiah 18-22, then Pray Psalm 113. Isaiah levels powerful prophecies against all the surrounding empires. Compare that with what he has to say about Jerusalem…

April 30

Read Isaiah 23-27, then Pray Psalm 114. Right in the middle of poetic prophecy of judgment, comes promises of hope!

May 1

Read Isaiah 28-30, then Pray Psalm 115. The rhythm falls back to “woe” (which means “death!”). Again, note the patterns of repetition with intensity.

May 2

Read Isaiah 31-35, then Pray Psalm 116. The core problems of Isaiah’s day still exist now. The difference now is that the Messiah has come. Just as the Israelites were called to trust the LORD, we are called to not put our trust in nations or empires, but rather in the KING. See how this promise of the coming King peaks in Isaiah 35 and note HERE the pattern of repetition with intensity.

May 3

Read Isaiah 36-38, then Pray Psalm 117. This section overlaps with the end of 2 Kings, telling the same events from Isaiah’s perspective.

May 4

Read Isaiah 39-41, then Pray Psalm 118. Isaiah 40 is quoted by John the Baptist at the beginning of Matthew, Mark and Luke. Spend extra time with Isaiah 40. It is one of the most important pivot points in all of Scripture. The promises here gush with hope and good news about how the LORD will deal—once and for all—with the problem of evil. His plan is revealed in beautiful poetic form from chapters 40 to 55.

May 5

Read Isaiah 42-44, then Pray Psalm 119:1-32. Pay close attention to the discussion of “my servant” or “the servant”. All of it is about Jesus. Sometimes there will be “servants” in the story, who are His people, and sometimes you will notice it is difficult to tell which one Isaiah is speaking about. You’ll wonder, is this about Jesus or about His people? Allow for that! For who is the Body of Christ?